My Quest to Teach with SWAG

Blogging in the areas of: STEAM/STEM instruction, Social Media Safety, Bullying/Cyberbullying Prevention. Sharing experiences as an instructor at Edward Waters College teaching Educational Technology infused with STEAM, Blogging and Social Media platforms. As a professional educator and parent I want to make sure I cover information that is relevant to parents, engaging in real world situations and application. Teaching over 25 years and speaking nationally, blogging internationally about safety and security on Social Media platforms and helping youth and teens overcome Bullying and Cyberbullying threats. Blogging on integrating Social Media in Ministry... and in every day life. Follow #MyQuestToTeach on Twitter - Facebook - Instagram - Tumblr - YouTube
Women of Color and Culture Need To Start Businesses

Women of Color and Culture Need To Start Businesses

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Women of Color and Culture Need To Start Businesses
by William Jackson
Social Media Visionary “My Quest To Teach”

“Xplosion 2017 A Break Through to a New You”

“There has never been a quiet Xplosion – live life!!!”
Terri Drummond, Community Activist and Entrepreneur

The ability to make significant changes in homes, communities,
or even in cities must be accomplished through education and
business involvement. Being an entrepreneur offers the
opportunity to create not just financial stability, it creates
opportunities for generational financial stability and continued
successes.
The recent “Xplosion 2017: A Breakthrough to a New You”
summit has shown that women of color and culture can be
successful in business and being entrepreneurs.
To have progress people must have control of their finances,
they must be able to determine where their monies are going
and what to invest in to make qualitative and quantitative
change.

Present at the summit where over 50 women that earned
higher educational degrees and involved in some form of
business and entrepreneurialism. Attending also where
young women with dreams of owning their own business,
not just working for someone else.

The Keynote speaker Dr. Monekka Munroe, Virginia Union
University, TEDx Speaker, and CEO of Great Minds Publishing
shared her educational and professional journey.
Achieving educational success and business success are only
accessible through determination, having a plan and the under-
standing that you must set goals, monitor your associations,
value education and learning. Life is a life-long journey of living
and learning.

The “Xplosion 2017: A Breakthrough to a New You” allowed
women to share their testimonies of having to overcome
challenges from family issues, educational challenges and
even medical challenges that may strike unexpectedly.
The importance of a strong prayer life and walking with a
purpose are fundamental keys to remaining mentally and
spiritually stable.

The summit encouraged the opportunity of unity and
collaboration of future projects and initiatives that will
benefit more families in their respective communities.
Business cards were readily shared to provide a platform
of community resources that showed economic strength
and the influence of commerce.

“You gain strength, courage and confidence by every
experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face.”
Eleanor Roosevelt #WomenInBusiness #BlackGirlsRock

Women have historically been denied access to the resources
to build their dreams, education provides the necessary
mental materials to understand the process and purpose of
how to start, manage and expand a business. Stated several
times that women are already great managers because  they
understand how to balance a family, organization and planning
are key, long range goals and the implementation of strategies
to move from week to week or month to month are required.

A successful home is only accomplished from proper
planning and scheduling, women are trained already
by their mothers, grandmothers and even aunties that
inherently pass this knowledge down through the
generations. Transferring these skills into a business is
second nature.

The workshops provided by veteran entrepreneurs
and business leaders ranged from how to start a
business, to the passion needed to sustain a business,
to personal challenges of finance, investment, family
contributions and hindrances.

Presented was a fashion show by Yvonne Cooney, feat.
Traci Lynn Jewelry. Vendors styled and profiled their
products and services to those attending. Events like
this are not just a quick hit, they are expanding the
opportunities for women to grow because they provide
a professional learning network of women that are
like minded and passion driven. The access to pro-
fessional learning communities that offer mentorship
and role models.

“Entrepreneurship is the last refuge of the trouble
making individual.” – Natalie Clifford Barney
One of the embers to spark the fire of discussion of why
women should go into business and to become entre-
preneurs is that fear can keep you from working towards
your dreams. Stated several times, “Your past can paralyze
you or propel you,” women should not allow their past
mistakes in relationships, finances and other business
ventures to stop them from working towards their goals.

They are the engineers of their future successes and
accomplishments. No one can share their passion and
excitement because it is within them like birthing a child.
The pain is worth the outcome……

Wyatt Reid – Edward Waters College Student
“Trust- trust in your brand as well as trust through
the community. With trust you can build a successful
organization and team. Trust takes time and you need
to define who you are. Develop your culture and allow
you to take off…”

The relationships formed and the trusts gained that
each person is a support system could be seen and
felt. There are increasing women businesses that are
influencing communities and generations.

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Resources:
Xplosion 2017 Photos via William Jackson
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/
williamdjackson/Xplosion%202017/story

Why Blacks Have To Start Businesses
a serious discussion on why Blacks need to
have businesses to influence commerce and
build generational stability.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALEodaehZfw

What Do You Do Before High School Graduation 2017

What Do You Do Before
High School Graduation 2017

William Jackson, M.Ed.
Edward Waters College
@wmjackson
#MyQuestToTeach

These suggestions are to
help as graduation gets closer.
Graduation, an end to an
educational journey from
Day Care to High School
Before this momentous occasion
parents need to make sure all the I’s are dotted and
T’s crossed to make a smooth closure to a long journey.
These are just a few suggestions from my experiences as
a parent and a teacher.
Parents make sure your child has enough credits to
graduate and has a “diploma” not a “certificate of
completion”.

Make sure your child understands that their journey
in public education maybe coming to a conclusion,
learning does not end there. It is a continuous
life-long process, ask anyone that is successful,
successful in their career and working in a “real”
career not just a job.

1. Make sure you
obtain the most
recent high
school “official”
transcript to send
too schools
or potential employers.
Many organizations,
schools and groups
require a transcript to see
if academically students
are “qualified” to be
eligible. The world is highly competitive and
education is the key to achievement and
advancement.

2. Make sure you have current and up to date
medical and dental records. Even after graduating
from high school students are still dependent
on their parents for certain medical services.
Parents must understand “their” graduate is not
an adult yet, they are still maturing, learning
and growing.
There is some information and documentation only
parents can obtain until children are 21 or even
25. As a parent of a 25 and 21 year old, I still
in some cases support my children outside of
money.

3. Make sure there are boundaries and expectations
on behaviors, actions, and even responsibilities
in the home for the soon to be graduates. There
should be mutual understanding on everyone’s duties
and responsibilities and always respect. Stop
telling your child they are “grown” until they are
out of your house and working independently.
Even that is not a guarantee that they will not
need some support until they are established and
able to support themselves.

4. Talk to your child’s teacher(s) about internships,
scholarships, summer employment and community
projects. Do not accept the words, “I got this,”
as being responsible and accountable. Parents end
up paying more in the long run, keep informed and
stay on your child unless they show responsibility.

5. Make hair, nail or beauty appointments months
before May to avoid the rush and chaos of getting
your child ready. Young men need to also reserve
haircuts, shaves, and clothing appointments.

6. Remind your child of the two institutions that want their
attendance Correctional (Prison) and Instructional (Higher
Education) and to make wise decisions even after graduation.
The closer it get to graduation sometimes kids lose touch
with reality and get “stupid” and maybe even “ignant” as
some seasoned seniors would say.

7. Check your child’s academic (Cumulative) folder for items
that may delay graduation or entrance into college, trade
school or the military. You have a right to see their
records and ask questions and if not provided seek an
attorney for help. Don’t wait for the last weeks to make
demands. It makes that person look like a fool because
there are 180 days in the school year, why did you wait.
Check for discipline referrals, changed grades, teacher
notes, etc. All documentation is important.

8. Make sure all deposits and fees are paid in full
before graduation. Check for lost books, needed forms
and other items that should be completed. Do not trust
your child unless they show they are responsible.
“I got this” are the words that put gray hairs
in more parents hairs because something will be
undone that costs money.

9. Know what your child’s GPA is, weighted or un-weighted.

10. Make sure your child takes or has taken the SAT
and the ACT several times.
Many schools only require one, but better safe
than sorry.

11. Check on Bright Futures scholarship information.
Many HBCU’s accept ACT scores that show your child’s
academic success and potential for future success.
Use whichever gives you a better chance of getting
into college and this may affect monies. Check athletic
scholarships, make sure it is a full ride or partial.
Does it cover books and incidentals?

12. Work on your child’s Marketable skills to help
them network and grow. Get them involved in community
events before they need community service hours, not
rushing to beg people to help and the child does not
learn anything from their experiences.

13. Set Academic, Professional, Monetary and Career
goals now so your child will have a flexible plan
of attack when they graduate.

14. Have your child volunteer consistently, stay
involved in your community, and church. Volunteer
hours can still help with networking and build
marketable skills to use later.

15. Search online and inquire with local businesses
about summer internships paid and unpaid. Your time
is valuable so unpaid is important also.

19. Join local business organizations like
Chamber of Commerce to gain marketable skills
and get a jump on career goals.

20. Participate in church events and activities
helps build your resume or CV curriculum vitae.

21. Take college tours, visiting the school
environment to make sure you are familiar with
college or even the military.

22. Social Media entries; post POSITIVE content,
pictures, text and video. Your e-Reputation and
e-Personalities tell a story about you. Social
Media content will define you and may be your
first representation of you to others.

23. Register with LinkedIn to start networking
and connecting. There is a NEW LinkedIn for
students. https://students.linkedin.com/

24. Continue to research educational options
and inquire even now about Masters and
Doctorial programs.

25. Make sure you and your child understand
what type of diploma they will have. It is
painful to expect a High School Diploma and
receive a Certificate of Attendance,
Certificate of Completion, an ESE Diploma or
others.

26. On Social Media unfriend and even block
those that are openly using drugs, weapons
and involved in criminal actions. You may be
“guilty by association” by having them part
of your network.

27. Have a “real” Social Security card, and Birth
Certificate, and if necessary a Visa to travel
abroad. Many high school students and those going
to college are even getting passports.

28. Check with your local police department to make
sure there are no records of mistaken criminal
activity from someone impersonating you or looks
like you.

29. Financial Aid and Scholarship Information can
be found online.
https://twitter.com/prepforcollege
@prepforcollege (Twitter) #CollegeChat,

30. Google and Hashtag yourself to “see” what is
online about yourself to be prepared for questions
of activities and events that your involved in.

31. Contact teachers and other professionals that
you may need letters of recommendations from them.
This is one reason why children need to be
taught to respect and honor adults because it is
the right thing to do and they WILL need their help.

32. Teach your children to be humble, approachable,
honest, responsible and accountable for their
actions. The world is sometimes an unforgiving
place and if mistakes are made sometimes an
apology is accepted, but if one is not given
that can be counted against them.

Parents sometimes it is hard to accept that the
apple does not fall far from the tree. So take
extra care to support your child to build
their confidence, to be proactive and
responsible.

The world has changed, being prepared means
being a well-rounded individual with people
skills, confidence and that understanding that
the world is based on global competition.
Teach your children early about the value of
having an education and being a life-long learner.

If interested in getting into business for girls,
young women and adult women Xplosion 2017
is for  you…

There Are More Hidden Figures Around Us

There Are More Hidden Figures Around Us

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Dr. Mae Jamison and Taylor Richardson

There Are More Hidden Figures Around Us
by Prof. William Jackson @wmjackson
Edward Waters College

“I’m just amazed at the shoulders that I’m standing
on to allow me to work to achieve my dreams.”
Taylor Richardson, attending “Hidden Figures”
premiere at the White House 2016

Dedicated to the past Hidden Figures that allowed
girls and boys to embrace STEM – STEAM – STREAM
and grasp new opportunities to fulfill dreams from the
depths of the sea, to the height of the clouds to the
deepest of space.
The movie ”Hidden Figures” 2016 is inspiring thousands
of girls and women to eliminate the fear of learning,
to understand the fun of exploration, embrace artistic
creativity, develop themselves as “thought leaders” and
“smart creatives.” To understand that it is ok to be smart,
gifted, talented and special. The perceived glass ceiling of
career limitations has been shattered by the flames of
curiosity to explore not just the limitations of earth’s
atmosphere and her seas, but has moved into the air less,
weightless and limitless expanse of space and time.

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The emergence of STEM – Science Technology Engineering
Math is looking good to girls and women as careers explode
in diversity in the embracing of girls and women into areas
at one time exclusively open to men, white men.
The irony of “Hidden Figures” is that research has proven
that women are more analytical and able to comprehend
and apply mathematics skills faster than men. They are more
detailed oriented and specific about applying learning to
real world situations.

African Americans and others of color have been involved
with most if not all space agencies, this involvement is not
just as custodians, cooks, maintenance and other support
personnel. These positions are important, they help the
people do the jobs they to do and service this country.
The other aspect is not just as service personnel, but the
intellectual abilities that allow for NASA and other agencies
to meet with success and build a legacy through the
intelligence of everyone that contributes. People of color
have always and will continue to contribute, they have not
received the recognition they deserve.

STEM / STEAM are the hottest sectors in the U.S. job market
and has grown to international levels. Even before it became
a commonly used word the elements of STEM have been
important. Because of movies like “Hidden Figures” and others
doors of imagination and dreams are growing for girls,
women, boys and men of color and culture.

STEM does not start in high school or higher education, it
starts in elementary education labs, classrooms and weekend
competitions and events. It starts in after school programs and
new curriculum’s that teachers have a passion to apply new
and exciting ways to engage students that were once thought
slow or different, but were actually higher order and critical
thinkers, just bored with cookie cutter teaching strategies
dated from the 1950s and 1970s. Today’s students need to
be engaged and active learners.

When I taught STEAM at an elementary Magnet it is important
that learning is relevant and students can apply their past
learning to new learning and integrate it to everyday life.
If students are not engaged mentally, actively involved, have
hands on activities and allowed to explore environments there
are lost opportunities to build the excitement to allow future
scientists, mathematicians, engineers, innovators and even
technical expertise in computers and robotics.

Many people still do not realize that STEAM and STEM run the
U.S. economy, look at the growth of careers that not only require
a college degree, but certifications. “The future of the economy
is in STEM,” says James Brown, the executive director
of the STEM Education Coalition in Washington, D.C. Even
President and Mrs. Obama have encourage STEM education
through grants and national programs.

Parents must understand as well that their children’s employment
are influenced by STEM. Employment in occupations related to
STEM science, technology, engineering, and mathematics is
projected to grow to more than 9 million jobs by 2022
nationally and internationally. Children now may now have to
find jobs in the U.S. and have to travel overseas, they must be
prepared to keep this nation competitive.

U.S. relationships with the world are important because if the
U.S. does not have friendly relationships globally then research
opportunities, international collaborations, joint projects and even
educational research will be at jeopardy. We cannot afford to be
secluded because the world is diversified in economic and social
diversity.
Students should be asking what their STEM futures are and how is
their current educational instruction preparing them for the future?
Parents should be asking are their children being prepared to be
employed or setup to be under or un – employed.

“One of the things that I’ve been focused on as President is how
we create an all-hands-on-deck approach to science, technology,
engineering, and math… We need to make this a priority to train
an army of new teachers in these subject areas, and to make sure
that all of us as a country are lifting up these subjects for the
respect that they deserve.”
President Barack Obama, Third Annual White House Science Fair,
April 2013

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Events like the FIRST LEGO LEAGUE by Mark Douglas McCombs
are foundations to engage youth, teens and young adults into
robotics, programming, design, innovation and as developers.
There are hundreds if not thousands of “Hidden Figures” in homes,
schools, communities, cites and this nation. They should be
encouraged, mentored and provided role models to spread their
wings to take flight to be unHidden…

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Parents your child may be the scientist to discover a cure for cancer,
diabetes, heart disease; your child may be the next deep sea
explorer or engineer to develop light speed, force fields or even
new fuels to power the world. Uncover the hidden talent in your child
by supporting their education, their thirst for exploration and their
gifted abilities.

Resouces:
Statistics uses data from Occupational Employment Statistics
https://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2017/science-technology-engineering-and-mathematics-stem-occupations-past-present-and-future/home.htm

FIRST LEGO LEAGUE
http://www.firstinspires.org/

Jacksonville Florida FIRST LEGO LEAGUE
https://www.facebook.com/markdmccombs

The Office of Science and Technology Policy
https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/women

Hidden Figures – Taraji P. Henson
https://m.facebook.com/amightygirl/posts/1222453677790943:0

EWC and DCPS Student to Speak at TEDxFSCJ Salon

EWC and DCPS Student to Speak at TEDxFSCJ Salon

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EWC and DCPS Students to Speak at TEDxFSCJ Salon

The opportunity to speak at a TEDx event is a great
honor and an awesome opportunity to share learning
that changes the paradigm of the intellectualism of teens
and young adults when talking about technology and applying
tech to influence changes in society.
TEDxFSCJ has been ongoing, providing great content
for discussions and actual application.

The national and global discussions provided by
diverse speakers enable those selected to share
their experiences, knowledge and passion in diverse
disciplines in fields such as medicine, science,
technology, religion, politics and engaging in the
area of thought leadership, unexplored creativity and
innovation.

TEDTALKS and TEDx are different entities, the
opportunity to share information and establish
connections are powerful. Selection is highly
respected and offers the chance to grow intellectually
because of the platform of engagement and collaboration
on multiple levels. TEDx are independently run
discussions.

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Johnathan Gregory a student at Edward Waters College
majoring in  Elementary Education and a proud member
of “Call Me Mister” program and Elisha Taylor a student
attending  Kirby Smith Middle School are both provided
the honor of being presenters at the upcoming
TEDxFSCJ Salon.

Each showing leadership abilities in their academic,
community service and application of the use and
integration of technology.

Mr. Gregory is not just a student at the historic
Edward Waters College, the oldest HBCU in Florida,
he is employed with TEAM UP at Pickett Elementary
School where he is involved in teaching, mentoring
and helping to build young minds for the future.
He has participated in several tech conferences in
Florida sharing his growing experience and skills
as a future educator and thought leader.
EdCampNABSE (Tampa, Florida,)  “TIGERTALKS
Experience” at Edward Waters College (Jacksonville,
Florida), WordCamp Conference (Philadelphia, Pa)
and other tech conferences.
Mr. Gregory is a proud graduate of The Bolles School
and attended Duval County Public Schools in his
elementary and middle school years.

elisha-at-tedx-salon

Elisha Taylor III an honor student at Kirby Smith
Middle, a Magnet School focusing on
STEM – Science Technology Engineering Mathematics.

Mr. Taylor has participated in several technology
conferences as well and attended TEDxFSCJ. Gaining
experience in speaking about and applying his
passion for technology that he has gained from school
and attending conferences like Florida Heritage
Book Festival (St. Augustine, Fl), EdCampMagic
(Orlando, Fl), WordCamp (Jacksonville, Fl.) and
technology Meetups.
Mr. Taylor is influenced by the speaking and presentation
abilities by his father the Senior Minister of Northbound
Church of Christ in Jacksonville, Florida.

Mr. Gregory and Mr. Taylor are
mentored by educator , blogger and professor
William Jackson a teacher with Duval County Public
Schools and professor at the historic Edward Waters College.
Prof. Jackson a blogger and speaker himself travels
nationally to tech conferences and involved in his
community.
Professor Jackson takes students on field trips
encouraging them to not only attend, but to
contribute to the discussions at conferences,
workshops and meetups. Learning, contributing and
applying the integration of technology as students
grow in knowledge and abilities.

This creates changes from teacher centered to student
centered learning and providing increased hands-on
opportunities for collaboration and application
to real world experiences and future careers.
TEDxFSCJ Salon theme is
“Our Digital Leaders of Tomorrow”
http://tedxfcsj.com

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Resources:
Jon Gregory:
Instagram @indo_jon
Twitter @Indo__Jon
William Jackson:
Twitter @wmjackson
Instagram
@williamdjackson
Dr. Jose Lepervanche
Twitter
@DrLepervanche
Instagram
@drlepervanche
Florida State College
Twitter
@TEDxFSCJ

Web
tedxfscj.com

 

Learn to Speak in Digital So Lo Mo Environments

Learn to Speak in Digital So Lo Mo Environments

Learn to Speak in Digital
So Lo Mo Environments
by William Jackson
Edward Waters College
@wmjackson
#MyQuestToTeach
Do you understand
the power of:
So social Lo local Mo
mobile how to implement the right technology.
Using digital tools and the integration of SoLoMo,
“Black Millennials are using their power to successfully
raise awareness of issued facing the Black community
and influence decisions shaping our world.”
http://mediaconfidential.blogspot.com/2016/10/
nielsen-black-millennials-close-digital.html

The ability to communicate using digital tools is important
in an age of progressive digital technologies. Mobile tech
has changed the way people are communicating daily.
Smartphones, tablets, watches and other digital mobile
devices allow for new methods to connect with family,
friends, and professional learning communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Software is becoming increasingly
intelligent and intuitive.
Whether you have an Android
or an iPhone the ability to
connect, collaborate and communicate has become
simplistic and literally at the touch of a button(s).
If you want to be taken seriously and looked upon as a
valuable resource you have to talk the talk, using the
words that connect like minds and even like goals.
No matter the age, generation, gender or life style
technology has the ability to connect two or two million.

 

Use your Social Media platforms to:
1. Be conversational
*the range of applications is as flexible as the type of
devices that are available.
*conversation is the foundation for networking and
building relationships.
*The power is in the software.
2. Share content – Sharing is Caring
*sharing content is important to growth and development
*the ability to create content, share content and archive
allows for influencing the present and the future.
3. Write / Blog Content is King
*to be a better blogger, you must write as much as possible.
*content creation is king as stated by Bill Gates in many
seminars and conferences.
*write to live and live to write is practiced in academia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Build your e-Reputation, e-Personality, e-Reliability
*having a reputation or a personality requires some type
of Social Media presence.
*the debate is still going on which one is better,
*the more the better depending on what audience you are
trying to reach.
5. Learn to listen
*teach yourself to listen to people talking about how
they use technology.
*learn the difference between integration, implementation,
and initiation of technology.
*join Meetups, EdCamps, and other social events that
connect like-minded people.
6. Take the time to read
*even though YouTube can provide almost all your instructional
needs, reading still cannot be beat.
*read about those that are innovators and smart creators.
7. Collaborate – Cooperation – Association
*CCA to build your knowledge, build your Brand and learn how
to Market your ideas and skills.
8. Understand your community
*you cannot be friends with everyone on all Social Media platforms.
*learn which sites are beneficial to your needs.
*don’t lose your time on useless Social Media sites that are
not productive.
9. Say more with less
*Twitter is 140 characters
*how can you communicate in 140 characters or less effectively?
10. Social Media is a “pull system” you must know your audience.
*understand who your following
*why your following someone
*who is following you
*why are they following you
11. Find your Niche
*finding your Niche is important
*your Niche is your voice and your presence online

12. How do you want people
to remember you?
*content rarely goes away,
it is archived, saved,
packaged and stored someplace
online.
*you create a digital legacy with your content.
*people will remember you through your content.
13. Build a personal mission statement
*when using Social Media build a mission statement
that can help you grow academically and professionally
14. Remember Social Media is about relationships.
*building relationships is important.
*how do you build relationships online?
*remember everyone does not have the same
mission as you are so be careful.
15. Develop your elevator pitch for those unique
times when you have one opportunity to make an
impression.
*Social Media may provide a one-time shot to pitch
your ideas to the “right” person so have your pitch
ready to go.
16. You cannot be shy in the Blogging / Technology
Industry.
*technology opens opportunities nationally and
globally as never before.
*being shy will get you literally no where.
*to be successful you cannot afford to be shy or
hesitant
17. Don’t view other bloggers as competition,
they are opportunities for collaboration.
*sometimes it is better to collaborate not compete
18. Brand vs Visual Identity
*learn the difference.
*how do people see you online?
19. Your Brand is your Promise
*your Brand continues to grow as your knowledge
and abilities grow.
*mentor and be a role model.
20. Your Brand and Niche should be a safe place,
make sure your association is approachable.
*what type of people are you associated with?
*do they have the same direction, mission and goals
as you do?
21. Be Authentic
*no one can be you, but you.
*don’t try to be something you are not
*don’t steal someone else’s ideas
*think about what you bring to the table.
22. Social Media can bridge Culture
*diversity is a good thing.
*diversity is a verb.
23. Be careful about being assimilated
*assimilation, association and application are
important.
24. You do not have to know everything
*apply what you learn and allow yourself to grow.
25. Attend conferences and Socials
*connect, socialize and be friends.
*never doubt your ability to be creative and innovative.

“Build your Brand as having
authority over your life.”
Wm Jackson