Little Miss Scare-All

A college goth trying to find her way in the world.
Alien Day: How to properly celebrate the new holiday

Alien Day: How to properly celebrate the new holiday

For us horror lovers out there, there aren’t many holidays to catch our fancy. Halloween only comes around once a year and days such as Thanksgiving and New Years Eve just don’t electrify the senses. With the sudden inception of Alien Day, however, it looks like things are about to change.

The holiday is very much in its infancy stage, with only a few hardcore fans catching on and celebrating, so local geek hangouts aren’t having any significant events lined up. If it grows to be a well-established day, which is certainly possible with the power of social media, this could end up not being the case in years to come. A chestburster can dream…

But enough about what this day can morph into. What matters is the now, so here’s a few ways you can spend your first ever Alien Day.

Treat yo self

Photo courtesy of Mondo

Photo courtesy of Mondo

Here’s the deal. Finding Alien merch in person isn’t the easiest thing to do. The series isn’t at Star Wars level nor will it ever be, meaning that store walls will never be lined with Xenomorph plushies or Newt shirts. And for those times that you do come across an item or two, selection is so small that chances are you won’t be interested in what you find.

As usual, I’m promoting the internet. This time around, Mondo is probably your best bet.

They’ve prepped up for the holiday, offering up items ranging from pins to vinyl to ugly Christmas sweaters. There’s even an adorable facehugger ski mask available. I won’t deny that the selection is a bit on the pricey side, but when your options are limited, you sometimes have to take the financial plunge.

Have a double feature

It’d be silly to go through the day without watching at least one flick in the series. I’d call the act blasphemous, even. Personally, I’d suggest sticking to the first two, and I’m sure many others would agree. While David Fincher is a god among men, Alien 3 is a release that should forever be ignored.

If you only have time for one of the movies, duke it out with your friends and determine whether the first or the second is superior. They’re both stylized in exceedingly different ways leading to contrasting atmosphere techniques and character roles, but they both have something to offer.

My vote goes for the movie that started it all; you just can’t go wrong.

Start designing a cosplay piece

Photo courtesy of cosplayer mostlymade

Photo courtesy of cosplayer mostlymade

MegaCon is right around the corner, but there’s still time to take out the ol’ sewing machine and make yourself into a Queen Alien. It’ll be the first of many sleepless nights, I’m sure, but the payoff will be worth it. Conventions are so full of Deadpools and furries that putting together such a piece is a definite way to make yourself stand out in the crowd.

For those of you who have minimal skills when it comes to costuming, there’s still hope to be had. A Ripley cosplay is rather simple to do, with most of it revolving around little details rather than a grand design. Hey, you can even pick up a patch from Mondo to go with your outfit.

 

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Current partakers in bad horror misunderstand what makes the subcategory work

Current partakers in bad horror misunderstand what makes the subcategory work

Oversaturation is killer, even when it attaches itself to a realm so heavily focused on death.

The horror genre has been consumed with purposely bad horror flicks for quite a while, but recently I’ve been noticing an increase in this particular subcategory. This should come as no surprise.

Technology and the Internet have allowed your average inspired citizen to take on filmmaking and garner attention for their efforts. I’m not demonizing these attempts for there have been instances in which the Internet has allowed talented groups of people (no, I’m never going to shut up about my love for Tangerine) to reach acclaim, but it’s impossible to deny that such an entertainment setting has allowed undeserving pieces to float to the surface.

Photo courtesy of Radiograph Pictures

Photo courtesy of Radiograph Pictures

Pair this with the popularity of The Room and RiffTrax, which have re-sparked the general public’s interest in subpar movies, and you’ve got yourself creations such as Revenge of the Spacemen, which sports an unfortunate mess of a trailer that wishes to rely on minimal and misplaced retro horror aesthetics with little else backing the flick.

This subcategory may appear to be perfect for the average, uninformed director newbie because low budgets typically accompany these types of movies, making it ideal for those who can’t afford the proper equipment and aren’t attached to a studio. It comes across as an easy path to take, both in financial and marketing terms, but what ends up happening is that the finished work betrays a complete avoidance of the fact that quality must go into low-quality material.

Some of you who’ve been keeping up with Little Miss Scare-All since its inception may be thinking, “But, Kim, you once blogged about how terribly made releases are necessary for the horror genre. Why the sudden backtracking?” I wouldn’t necessarily consider this an evolution of opinion, rather an expansion of it.

Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

See, good bad horror walks along a line defined by the formulaic. You have to have the cheesy, laughable threat paired up with abysmal acting and questionable cuts. It’s part of the territory. What many people are forgetting it seems is that story is just as important here, maybe even more so.

When you’re working so hard to produce a garbage product, you need to at least give someone a reason to look at your pile of trash. If you don’t, well, it’s just trash. If there’s not a story to be invested in or at the very least characters with addictive personalities to ooze over, then you’re basically asking your audience to sit down and suffer for 90 minutes. You’ve given them no reward.

There’s more to it than the intentional mistakes. Presenting junk as valuable junk is an art form, and people should stop underestimating the amount of effort that goes into such an endeavor.

 

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The Witch successfully summons unnerving ambience

The Witch successfully summons unnerving ambience

In the middle of a Halloween rewatch with my friend last week, I noticed that the best horror films have the most simplistic plots. A woman is paranoid that her neighbors are Satanists. A group of friends are being attacked in a cabin deep in the woods. The loglines are easy to come up with, yet their related movies are rich and memorable.

This holds true for The Witch.

The buzz has been going on and on about this particular flick ever since the unsettling trailer came out. I immediately knew that I needed to watch it, but I was simultaneously worried that it’d be all atmosphere and not much else. What happened instead was a pleasant albeit disturbing surprise.

Photo courtesy of A24

Photo courtesy of A24

It all begins with a religious Puritanical-era family leaving a village after the father, William (Ralph Ineson), disagrees with the leaders on how to worship. Their migration leads them many miles away to a seemingly secluded part of Northeast America.

It only takes a few months for their exile to turn sour, which is putting it lightly. A game of pee-ka-boo between older sister Thomasin (Anya Taylor-Joy) and newborn Samuel morphs into a game of hide-and-seek when she uncovers her eyes and finds her baby brother to be missing. Unlike a horror movie from earlier this year, the forest right at the edge of this family’s living situation is actually creepy. It is here that the poor babe is taken, sacrificed by a witch for her devilish purposes.

The decline that follows is rapid. Mother Katherine (Kate Dickie) turns on her own daughter with a continuous glare of judgment and suspicion. William fails his family by producing a pitiful crop and not being able to hunt to make up for it. Suddenly this open space they live in feels like a trap. Physically speaking, the woods don’t move closer, but the threat it holds does.

Photo courtesy of A24

Photo courtesy of A24

Lucifer’s gaze shifts from behind the tree branches into the eyes of Black Phillip, a wicked goat that dashes onto their land. His stay is permanent, and the alarmingly young twins Mercy and Jonas immediately take a liking to him. Damnation has visited this family personally.

It could be easy for someone to write off the Satanic symbolism in The Witch as stereotypical, but it never once comes across as cheap. The haunting score paired with bleak cinematography allows for the natural placement of such moments for it’s these instances that add vibrancy to the setting. The most colorful images are the most striking, and it’s their spare use that allows them to be easily seared onto your brain.

This is a story of temptation. There’s various levels of sin in this movie, and Robert Eggers effortlessly explores every single one. There were a few shots that lingered longer than necessary or that weren’t needed at all, but it’s still incredibly impressive for someone’s directorial debut.

If you’re looking to jump out of your seat in terror, this one isn’t for you. If you’re hoping to have discomfort overcome you in a darkened movie theater, then go and buy a ticket. Come on, The Witch is Satanic Temple-approved; viewing it can at least work as a conversation starter.

 

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Celebrating Valentine’s Day horror-lover style

Celebrating Valentine’s Day horror-lover style

I’ve never been big on the whole Valentine’s Day thing, at least in the traditional sense. Oversized stuffed animals are a burden, cheesy dates make me roll my eyes into oblivion, and if I see one more Facebook post in which someone gushes about their significant other, I might puke.

There’s nothing wrong with these things actually, no, that last one is actually kind of annoying but it’s not for everyone. If you fantasize about candlelit dinners with Barry White music playing in the background, congratulations! Society has already designated a structure that will do wonders for you and your beloved on this holiday.

But what about us darker folks? There’s not really a guidebook on how to take things to a Gomez/Morticia level for V-Day… until now.

Go to your local oddities shop

The whole point of giving someone a gift is that they’ll enjoy it, and if your darling is into the macabre, then you might as well stroll past the holiday section at the grocery store and visit your nearest oddities shop instead. These babies seem to be popping up more and more lately, and the items they offer are fascinating and beautiful. You’ll find wet specimens, human hearts and probably some stuffed chicks. Each place has its own unique collection of items to offer, such as Orlando’s very own Carmine Boutique. If you don’t have an oddities provider near you, there are plenty of stores that also sell their products online. Pair that order with express shipping though; the day of love is coming fast.

Marathon thriller-romance films

Photo courtesy of Drafthouse Films

Photo courtesy of Drafthouse Films

Let’s face it, Nicholas Sparks sucks. In fact, most romance movies suck, at least the ones that try and fit every Hollywood celebrity into 90 minutes for quick box office smash. Thankfully, there are some morbid options for couples that wish to stay indoors and cuddle up on the couch for a night. Let the Right One In is cinematic gold. Its use of atmosphere and sound editing makes it one of the best horror films of all time and exemplifies that vampire-love stories can indeed work. Spring is a more recent option and has a heavier focus on the romance, if you’re looking for more passion in your selections.

Have a picnic at a nearby graveyard

Okay, I know, stereotypically goth-y, but what can I say? It’s a cute thing to do. Pack up a picnic blanket with some sandwiches, and suddenly you have a nice meal in a calm setting. Liven up your lunch a bit (you’ll probably have to do lunch since most cemeteries close at night) by bringing along a book of short stories to read aloud to each other. Lovecraft and Poe works if you’re looking for a classic approach, but I suggest digging deep into the nostalgia pit by bringing along a copy of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.

Cook a horror-themed dinner

Photo courtesy of Bryanston Pictures

Photo courtesy of Bryanston Pictures

If you want to put more effort into your meal, there’s plenty of recipes that will add a grisly flair to every bite. Martha Stewart has an impressive collection of ideas you can pull from in case you want to try your hand at making a plate of “devilish eggs” or “mashed boo-tatoes.” Pinterest is another spot to check out for ideas, ranging from appetizers to extravagant entrees. I think it goes without saying that pairing your meal with red wine is a must.

 

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Horror and the Oscars: A tale of stubbornness

Horror and the Oscars: A tale of stubbornness

2015 was rather forgettable when it came to movies. For most of what I’ve seen, the extent of my feelings can be quickly summarized as, “I guess it was enjoyable,” which is rather depressing given how good 2014 was.

The Hateful Eight was Tarantino at his weakest. Room was fine but not anywhere near noteworthy. Carol, a film surrounding two underdeveloped characters, was built on hype. The Oscars doesn’t have much going for it this awards season.

Some might blame this on the numerous pieces of Oscar bait that production companies have put out, but I find that to be more of a symptom of the overarching Hollywood illness that has been left untreated. The Oscars refuse to get with the times. It’s that simple. Film has changed, especially drama, and that’s something worth noting. Award shows should be applauding innovative releases, but instead they have firmly rooted themselves in the past.

Bridge of Spies is the definition of Oscar bait. (photo courtesy of Walt Disney Studios)

Bridge of Spies is the definition of Oscar bait. (photo courtesy of Walt Disney Studios)

This is what makes Oscar bait possible. It’s gotten to the point where one can predict what the Academy wants. Many times these films are nominated and many times they win. The process has become formulaic, laughable and malignant.

But where does horror fit in to this predictable equation? Well, it doesn’t. Horror is filmed, scored, lighted and acted in differently than what the Academy desires. What ends up happening is that strong films, such as the chilling It Follows, are ignored completely. Although The Academy was right in not including it in any of the acting categories, I strongly believe that it deserved at the very least a Best Cinematography and Original Score nod.

I’m bitter. I’m extremely bitter. I’ll be the first to admit that 95% of the genre is absolute garbage, but there’s a glorious 5% that deserves recognition. You’re telling me that the mess that is Forrest Gump won an Oscar but that the artful The Thing and The Shining didn’t? That’s blasphemy if I ever did see it.

There have been some horror films that the Oscars have taken note of, as was the case in 1974 when The Exorcist was a contender for Best Picture, but instances such as these happen so few and far between that they become more of a miracle than anything else.

Hopefully these Mad Max nominations serve as an avenue for growth instead of a singular event. (photo courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures)

Hopefully these Mad Max nominations allow for growth instead of becoming a singular event. (photo courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures)

Thankfully, I see some change on the horizon. Mad Max is the complete opposite of what the Academy usually goes for, and yet it received an impressive amount of nominations. Combine that with the organization altering their life-long membership policy, and suddenly there’s an avenue for hope.

Maybe things will start looking up. Maybe horror will be shown more love. It might take a while, and I’m sure countless movies will be ignored during this evolutionary process, but I’m optimistic that things are moving towards a more accepting awards season.

 

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How to avoid the subpar horror releases of the year

How to avoid the subpar horror releases of the year

A new year means a new batch of horror movies will be making the rounds. You’ll be tempted by the good, the bad and the ugly, and at times it might be hard to know which releases are worth seeing. Most films in the genre are mere photocopies of overused formulas, so if you go in blind, chances are it’s going to suck.

If you’re the kind of person who doesn’t want to know too much before entering the theater, there’s still a way to better your chances of paying for an enjoyable flick. All you need to do is watch the trailer

The easiest thing to look out for is the celebrity status of the movie. Are you merely excited because a specific actor is attached to the project? This is a common tool used by Hollywood to make up for weak writing. Audiences follow familiar faces similar to how consumers are more comfortable with products they constantly see on TV.

A recent example of this is The Forest, staring Natalie Dormer.

The promotion for this movie focused almost entirely on the actress, probably in an attempt to rein in Game of Thrones fans. It currently has an 11% on Rotten Tomatoes. What makes this situation happen over and over again is that casting directors are so focused on star power that they forget to analyze whether an actor can establish a slow progression into fear. Dormer, for instance, puts on too dramatic of a face to be believable.

Not all horror films with A-listers are unwatchable, but it’s important to ask yourself why they were given the role.

Tropes, the second thing you should look out for, are easy to register because we see them all the time. A creepy rocking chair, nursery rhymes sung by children, kids who look like they were raised by Lucifer himself. If the creepiest moments of a piece have been done over and over again, it stops being scary.

What upcoming movie is a perfect example of this?

I’ve been laughing ever since I saw the trailer for The Boy a few months ago. I thought we were over the whole doll thing but apparently not. However, tropes aren’t always the centerpiece of a horror film. When watching a trailer, keep your eyes open for what’s being presented as “scary.”

If you’ve seen the trailer and it doesn’t seem to rely on star power or overdone scare tactics but you still aren’t sure whether you should check it out, there’s one more aspect to look out for, and it isn’t as easy to spot as the others.

What makes a horror film forgettable is when it’s too focused on being a horror film. If you walk onto a set with the sole purpose of producing something that will terrifying your audience, you’ve already dedicated yourself to making a movie that will be defined by its inability to stand out. Without a strong foundation in story and character, your film will remain hollow.

With something like Amityville: The Awakening, I can’t bring myself to care about these people, and thus I don’t care about what happens to them. Their backstory of moving around is a sad excuse for a scene setter and establishment of teenage angst. These characters could be anybody. When all that matters is that something happens to the people in your story, it’s sure to be a film to avoid.

Now, if you prefer to not watch trailers before giving a movie a shot, that works too. Just don’t I say I didn’t warn ya.

 

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New Years resolutions: What horror aficionados should pledge to do

New Years resolutions: What horror aficionados should pledge to do

As this year hides behind us, an array of New Years resolutions rise up from the depths of hesitance. Everyone pledges to eat healthier or to give up some bad habit. When admitting to their determinations for the year to come, people often finish with a sigh. Why is it that people are so unhappy with their plans? Shouldn’t this promised change be something they should look forward to? No wonder so many people give up after the first week or just don’t try at all.

Horror lovers have it a bit easier, so toss your taxing resolutions aside. These plans hold not a hint of bore.

Watch more foreign language horror

(photo courtesy of Moho Films)

(photo courtesy of Moho Films)

The genre has dug its roots deep into the globe, yet the movies most people seem to talk about come from English-speaking countries. This is the case for a lot of foreign films as well. I adore The Babadook, but other countries exist too, which is why I was excited about A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night. There’s a beautiful array of culture out there in the world, and each of it brings its own folklore and shooting style to the mix. Open your doors to the world; you won’t be disappointed.

Check out the shorts

(photo courtesy of Shant Hamassian)

(photo courtesy of Shant Hamassian)

This is something I actually need to work on more. Other than catching a few shorts every so often, I hadn’t delved much into this side of things. That changed at Spooky Empire earlier this year when I attended one of the short film screenings. As expected, there were a few duds, but the rest were solid works of horror. There’s something intriguing about being able to frighten people or make them laugh at the macabre in only a matter of minutes.

Create your own pieces

(photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures)

(photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures)

Sometimes it’s not enough to just observe the evolution of horror around you; many movie lovers out there are host to a strong urge to create as well. What many people fail to realize, however, is that you don’t need to have access to film equipment worth thousands of dollars to satisfy this need. Although not a horror film, Tangerine was filmed on an iPhone, the high quality achieved through a reasonably-priced Moondog Labs anamorphic adapter. For a cast and crew? Use your friends. It’s all about the drive, so if you want to do it, go for it!

 

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Parenting done right: Introducing your kid to horror

Parenting done right: Introducing your kid to horror

A few months ago I gave some tips on how to handle new horror fans with care. But what if this new horror fan is your child? Well, that changes things up a bit.

Horror is bombarded with bloody scenes, sex scenes and bloody sex scenes, so depending on your kid’s age, a lot of the genre is inappropriate. Finding the right starting point is difficult with what’s currently being released, but there’s hope.

If your spawn is too young to remain interested in a feature-length movie, TV shows are the way to go. Some kids are more sensitive than most, so introducing them to monsters through the old Scooby-Doo cartoons can be a way to ease them in without frightening them away. If your kid is tougher than others, however, I’d recommend jumping straight to the scary stuff.

(photo courtesy of Cartoon Network)

(photo courtesy of Cartoon Network)

Courage the Cowardly Dog, which is currently streaming on Netflix, is a satisfying introduction.  It has some comedic elements, but the foundation of each episode is downright creepy. The infamous “King Ramses’ Curse” episode was known to have given kids nightmares back in the day, but there’s also lighthearted content to balance it out.

Everyone mentions Are You Afraid of the Dark? and Goosebumps, but one show no one seems to talk about is Truth or Scare. This early millennium Discovery Channel series, which lasted only 20 episodes, laid its foundation in history. Horror host Michelle Trachtenberg would entertain kids with talks of famous “witches” or how the legend of Dracula came to be, among other things. While it’s up to one to decide if the supernatural elements brought up are true, there are actual facts to be learned from the show. It’s eerie and educational.

Once you feel that your child is at the age where they can pay full attention to a movie, the doors open significantly wider. Your best bet is to start with showing them a movie that has horror elements but isn’t necessarily horror. However tame Disney might be, they have a great selection. Hocus Pocus and Halloweentown are absolute classics. They’re goofy to a degree, but that’s what makes them work so well for such situations.

(Photo courtesy of Warner Bros.)

(Photo courtesy of Warner Bros.)

Sometimes starting a child’s love for horror isn’t necessarily about showing them someone getting stabbed a million times over. All you need is that special spark that they’ll keep revisiting as they grow older. This is why Edward Scisssorhands and Beetlejuice stuck with me so much. The humor was dark and the fashion was gothic. I was in awe of this macabre reality which was so different from the world around me.

And hell, if you’re comfortable with showing your child some of the PG-13 and R-rated flicks out there, by all means, go ahead. I discovered such films at a young age, and I honestly don’t feel like it had a negative impact. The only way it changed me was that I knew about some things my classmates didn’t. Plus, I got to say that I saw some pretty damn good movies.

If none of this works, your kid simply might not like horror, and that’s okay. They’re still your kid after all.

 

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Krampus sleighs its way into the Christmas scene

Krampus sleighs its way into the Christmas scene

You better watch out. You better not cry. You better not shout, or Krampus and his helpers will murder your entire family.

Set aside your hot cocoa and stockings, everyone; Michael Dougherty is back for another holiday adventure, this time following the German legend the movie takes its name after. For those unaware of the folklore, Krampus is a two-legged, horned, hooved and menacing beast who punishes the naughty children of the world. Santa gives coal? Ha! How tame. There’s a reason this fella is known as the shadow of Saint Nicholas.

What a cute lil fella.

What a cute lil fella.

The naughty ones of our story, other than our antagonist of course, compose an entire family. It’s only a few days before Christmas, yet not a hint of cheer can be found in this household of overly-critical individuals. At the center of it all is Max, a boy who’s kind at heart and just wants everyone to cherish the days ahead. When it becomes clear that this won’t happen, he abandons all faith in Santa and togetherness.

The snow begins to rumble down as the child’s anger draws Krampus into his suburban neighborhood. Now these people really have something to complain about. Mostly, you know, dying.

It’s a movie that doesn’t take itself too seriously, never fully venturing into horror or comedy territory. Even with the majority taking place in darkness, it’s filled with a relaxed feel. This works for the first half, but it starts to lose its touch when there’s no real tension being built up. You can only do this for so long before every scene starts to feel the same.

The movie stars Adam Scott, Toni Collette and David Koechner (photo courtesy of Universal pictures)

The movie stars Adam Scott, Toni Collette and David Koechner (photo courtesy of Universal Pictures)

What I loved about Dougherty’s Trick ‘r Treat was that, despite its comedic foundation, it still led me to wonder what would happen next. The last story had me captured and anxious as I waited to see where danger would strike. Therein might be the problem. The move from an anthology format to a fleshed out feature film is a big one, and it seems that the director/writer missed a few steps.

Now don’t get me wrong, I did enjoy this movie; it’s a B- in my eyes. It just bothers me to see someone go from a great film to an all right one. I know the potential is there, so let’s count this as a practice run I suppose.

If anything, seeing the folklore come to life makes me smile (the amount of screen time he’s given is almost Jaws-like), and the ability to make this seem like a family Christmas movie to a degree is commendable. It’s not next to Black Christmas on my holiday-viewing horror list, but it’s definitely on there.

 

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Horror shouldn’t be judged by how scary it is

Horror shouldn’t be judged by how scary it is

The Internet is abuzz with people stating that they’ve found the scariest movie of the past few years. These posts are so sure of themselves, that is until they find the next scariest horror film the following week. I’ve got one site declaring The Witch to be unbearably terrifying while another calls The Taking of Deborah Logan the most horrifying movie on Netflix.

I see posts like these all the time and while their air of certainty may vary, there’s one thing that stays the same: the comments.

A collection of screenshots I recently took from a Facebook comment section.

A collection of screenshots I recently took from a Facebook comment section.

An overwhelming about of them will be about how the movie isn’t scary at all which somehow leads to the conclusion that it’s a waste of time. What a narrow-minded and simplistic method of judgment. This one-step way of declaring a verdict would leave me without horror films to love.

Maybe it’s because I’ve been watching horror movies since my toddler years, but I’ve never once been scared by one, and yet it’s one of my favorite genres. While I’m sure it’s a thrill having a piece of entertainment leave you unnerved and suspicious of every dark corner as you crawl into bed at night, I see it as a mere bonus.

It’s telling that some of the classics aren’t host to a spine-chilling effect; I have yet to meet someone who doesn’t love Night of the Living Dead, but I’ve also never met anyone who’s been scared by it.

This is a journey of survival in a horror environment. Enjoyable without the need for absolute terror.

This is a journey of survival in a horror environment. Entertaining without the need for absolute terror. (photo courtesy of The Water Reade Organization)

I’ve been seeing a lot of praise for Kristy this week (sidenote: you’re better off watching You’re Next) but I don’t see many instances in which someone could actually be scared by it.

This is a genre routed in the psychological with an occasional dash of comedy. It’s why Rosemary’s Baby is more mysterious than anything else and why many people enjoy watching Black Christmas when December rolls in.

If a movie is actually scary, by all means, applaud it, but it shouldn’t be the most important box on the “Is a horror movie worth it?” checklist.

With the desensitization brought to us by the Internet age, there’s not much that can scare the general population anymore. I think the only person that’s been scared by a movie recently has been my sister, and that’s just because it’s not that hard to have that affect on her. If we don’t stop holding horror to currently unreachable standards, we’re all going to be a very unhappy bunch. Enjoy it for the ride; that’s what it’s there for.

 

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