Little Miss Scare-All

A college goth trying to find her way in the world.
The Green Inferno is a satirical, bloody ride

The Green Inferno is a satirical, bloody ride

Cannibal Holocaust Pt. II came out today, but many of you probably know it by its official name: The Green Inferno.

The new movie from director Eli Roth has finally hit theaters after much buzz on social media, and if you like your horror with a side of comedy, it’s worth checking out.

It all starts with college freshman Justine (Lorenza Izzo) being woken by the chants of protesters outside her window. Their cries are intruding, their self-importance more so. They lack an inner Rosa Parks or a Gloria Steinem and instead encompass the role of those that think activism is trendy. They find themselves to be saints and saviors when really they’re privileged knights in rusting armor. Oh so edgy.

(photo courtesy of Blumhouse Tilt)

(photo courtesy of Blumhouse Tilt)

A lecture on female genital mutilation leads our heroine to this group, and it’s clear that she doesn’t fit in. As if her name doesn’t say it all, she genuinely cares about the people of the world. This is a stark contrast to Alejandro (Ariel Levy), the leader of the pack, who believes negative action leads to positive change. His solution to stopping female genital mutilation would be to go to the villages that partake in this custom and shame them for the world to see. A better life, he insists, as his air of superiority wordlessly labels these people as animals.

At one of the group’s meetings, it’s announced that a trip to the Amazon is being organized to stop a construction company’s path of deforestation which would displace many indigenous peoples. The plan? Bring their cell phones along (of course!) so the world can see the chaos stirred up when they chain themselves to trees in the bulldozer’s path.

No one should be shocked when things don’t go according to plan. Stuck in the green inferno and in the hands (and eventually the stomachs) of a cannibalistic tribe, the clueless and sometimes malignant nature of these SJWs comes to light.

(photo courtesy of Blumhouse Tilt)

(photo courtesy of Blumhouse Tilt)

The Green Inferno is bloody although surprisingly not as gore-filled as its namesake. Each death is comedic and every struggle these students go through merits a chuckle. It’s enjoyable seeing these people, who care more about publicity than their cause, suffer, and this is where it varies from Cannibal Holocaust. The tone of the latter, especially in the last act, is serious and unnerving. Here, life is simply mock-serious; it’s a laugh at 20-somethings who feel that they know the world just because they took a sociology class their first year of college.

It’s not groundbreaking by any means, but it’s still a fun, quick ride. Even with a lackluster ending, somewhat bearable acting and an unnecessary mid-credits scene, I think it should be added to people’s watch lists, albeit their Redbox one.

 

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Iconic horror villains are an endangered species

Iconic horror villains are an endangered species

If we turn one way, a dirtied, eerie hockey mask meets our eye. On our other side is the chewed up bubblegum countenance of a killer. Whether they’re concealed or not, these faces along with a slew of others, are classic horror villains and they’re splattered on every type of merch imaginable.

They’re also on the brink of extinction.

Maybe it's would've been better if they didn't make their villain look like a member of Slipknot. (photo courtesy of Summit Entertainment)

Maybe it’s would’ve been better if they didn’t make their villain look like a member of Slipknot. (photo courtesy of Summit Entertainment)

The classic horror villain used to be a renewing concept, but this past decade has seen the idea slip away. There have been some films that have decided to follow a villain, such as the Sinister series, but their antagonists are unable to seep into the pop culture subconscious of viewers.

Weak plotting or bad acting can be blamed, and I’m sure that’s at least partially true, but it goes beyond that. Maybe their appearance isn’t all too memorable. Again, another possibility, but when it comes down to it for these characters, I think personality is simply way more important than looks.

Sticking a character in the serial killer slot and not building upon that leads to a static frame. These horror villains exist just like the victims in the story. They run or they stumble or they dissipate in one spot only to appear in another.

Michael Myers is known for his unhurried walks towards his next murder victim. He doesn’t need to run; he’s comforted with the notion that it’ll be a successful kill. This exudes a confidence in his craft that we can all feel.

When you can imprison your character and still have him freak people out, you've done a phenomenal job. (photo courtesy of Orion Pictures)

When you can imprison your character and still have him freak people out, you’ve done a phenomenal job. (photo courtesy of Orion Pictures)

On the borderline of the genre is Hannibal Lecter. He’s one of those talky types, a man whose every word stings with self-aware intelligence. All movements are calculated  you can see it in his eyes  which is what adds to the thrill of the story.

You look back decades earlier, and these kinds of character were being pumped out left and right. The last horror villain I find to be truly iconic is Jigsaw, and he made his debut almost 12 years ago. Have writers gotten lazy or did people let go of their inner Robert Graysmith and not need to know anything about the antagonist.

Earlier this week, Rob Zombie made a claim on his Facebook page that one of his characters from his upcoming film 31 will reach iconic horror villain status.

“DOOM-HEAD (aka Richard Brake) does not fuck around. This guy is one fucking intense dude.

I predict that he is the next great villian of horror.”

Guess we'll find out soon enough. (photo courtesy of Front Row Filmed Entertainment)

Guess we’ll find out soon enough. (photo courtesy of Front Row Filmed Entertainment)

Zombie is familiar with reaching cult classic status due to the Firefly Family’s success, but I’m not too sure he’ll experience that again. Everyone but me seemed to hate The Lords of Salem so it’ll be difficult to burrow into the hearts of horror lovers again.

Horror’s dry spell is wearing off, with the past year having been a phenomenal ride for the genre. Plot has picked back up again as have scores. Maybe they’ll let the next batch of horror villains hitchhike for the ride. Nubbins Sawyer would really appreciate it.

 

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Twitter: @TheKimSlichter

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